The Best of Yachting~ In The Heart Of The Puget Sound










 MONITOR PROCEDURES  & SAFETY

  

MONITOR PROCEDURES

 

SIYC Monitor Procedures – “Seahorse, Seahorse, Seahorse”

SIYC has recently updated and adopted specific monitoring procedures so that all “Seahorses” can connect with other “Seahorses” while on the water.  We encourage all members to follow these procedures and enjoy each others company at every available opportunity.

 

First, a review of USCG and FCC regulation:

http://www.navcen.uscg.gov/?pageName=mtWatch

 

USCG/FCC Radio Watchkeeping Regulations

In general, any vessel equipped with a VHF marine radiotelephone (whether voluntarily or required to) must maintain a watch on channel 16 (156.800 MHz) whenever the radiotelephone is not being used to communicate.

 

Note: Although an SIYC member is not likely to fall into parameters that would require additional monitoring, there are specifics regarding the size of vessel or it’s use may require you to monitor an additional channel, which would require maintaining two radios (or one duel band radio) on board. 

 

“Seahorse, Seahorse, Seahorse” – SIYC Monitor Procedures

Per regulations stated above, The Club encourages all members to monitor VHF Channel 16 at all times while on the water (Please see specific Do’s and Don’ts listed below).  In addition, whether you are underway, at port or hanging on a hook or a buoy, we ask that you monitor take special care to monitor Channel 16 from 1600 to 1630 hours each afternoon.  As long as there are no emergency activities occurring and the radio traffic allows you are encouraged to call out the following:

                                           

 “Seahorse, Seahorse, Seahorse ~ this is the [vessel name or radio call sign]”

Should you hear this call out respond as follows:

“Seahorse ~ this is the [vessel name or radio call sign] ~ request change to channel (68, 69, 71, 72 and 78A are Puget Sound Recreational Use Channels)”

Switch to agreed on channel, determine whereabouts, discuss plans or needs.  You may find other members out there who may know the best local moorage, have beverages or a meal to share.  You may find a member Seahorse out there who was not particularly in “distress” by Coast Guard standards but they are in need of assistance none the less…  Maybe someone is in need of a short range tow due to engine failure, rig failure, out of gas, etc. or maybe they just have a need for an extra set of hands wrenching on a particularly stubborn bolt.  Club Members helping Club Members – A bit of what it’s all about!

 

 

Additional VHF Guidance

 

Boat U.S. Suggests the following VHF Dos and Don’ts

 The Dos:

Whenever the radio is on, monitor Channel 16, unless you are communicating on another channel;

Before transmitting, listen for 30 seconds to hear if the channel is in use;

At the beginning and end of your transmission, identify your vessel by its name of your radio call sign;

Use Channel 16 or 9 for calling and when contact is made, switch immediately to an unused working channel; (See box)

Set the radio to the low power setting whenever possible; you don;'t need the high power setting to talk to somone across your creek;

Speak slowly and clearly with the microphone about an inch from your mouth; there's no need to shout- it distorts your transmission;

Keep all communications as brief as possible;

 

The Don'ts:

Don't call the Coast Guard requesting a radio check;

Don't use the VHF radio for transmitting on land;

Don't monopolize any channel with long conversations or idle chatter;

Don't let children use the radio or think it's a toy. don't allow children to play on the boat with no adult present, even in the driveway;

Don't broadcast a Mayday unless there is immediate danger to life or property;

Don't broadcast profanities or insults. It is a criminal offense to transmit obscene, profane or indecent language or meanings;

Don't speak on channel 70; it's reserved for Digital Selective Calling (DSC) only;

 

Channels Available for Recreational Boats

Distress, Safety, Calling...................................16

Calling..........................................................................9

Recreational Use...........................68-69, 71-72, 78

Example of proper calling:

Blue Duck: “Mary Jane, this is Blue Duck, waz1234.”

Mary Jane: “Blue Duck, Mary Jane.”

Blue Duck: “Reply 68.”

(USCG website information: www.navcen.uscg.gov/marcomms/boater.htm)


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• US Customs Telephone Numbers
• Home  

When a yacht or any other type of pleasure boat arrives in the United States, the first place it docks must be at a Customs port or other place where Customs service is available. Contact the Customs port director at any of the ports of entry.



US CUSTOMS TELEPHONE NUMBERS

Aberdeen................... (360)532-2030

Anacortes.................. (360)293-2331

Bellingham................ (360)734-5463

Blaine......................... (360)332-5771

Everett........................ (425)259-0246

Friday Harbor........... (360)378-2080

Point Roberts........... (360)945-2314

Port Angeles............ (360)457-4311

Port Townsend........ (360)385-3777

Seattle........................ (206)554-0770

Tacoma...................... (253)593-6336


Other Important Phone Numbers:

360-378-2155.....Vessel Assist

800-367-8222.....West Marine

360-376-2314.....Whale Hot Line

800-562-8832.....Wolf Hollow Wildlife Center

360-378-5000......US Customs Clearing

800-562-5943.....US Customs - Friday Harbor

360-378-2080.....Canadian Customs Clearing

888-226-7277.....US Coast Guard - Seattle

206-220-7001.....US Coast Guard - Local

360-734-1692.....San Juan County Cell Phone 911





















 

 

 

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